Finding Curacao

by Marcus · 09.01.2013 · Escapism · 6 comments

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Get­ting out of this Ber­lin winter mess is the num­ber one theme every­body talks about right now. It could be easy to join the party but we rather want to be your ambas­sad­ors for the sun with this post.

Last novem­ber we got invited to visit the carib­bean island Cur­a­cao together with Clem­ens of iGNANT, Katja of Trave­lettes and Bon­nie of Strange Ambi­tion and spent a whole week in this secret place just 70 km north of Venezuela.

I have to con­fess that the only thing I knew about Cur­a­cao was the blue liquor you mix up with orange juice and get a green cock­tail out of it. But in the last years it became a part of my travel style to arrive abso­lutely object­ive at a loc­a­tion and start to explore with a free mind. In the case of Cur­a­cao it wasn’ t this easy.

The moment you hear “Carib­bean Island” your little european heart starts hyper­vent­il­at­ing and you instantly have flash­backs of the 1980′ s palm wall­pa­per in your liv­ing room. You pic­ture everything per­fect and dreamy and all that includ­ing tur­qoise water, brown beach beau­tys, dol­phins and rain­bows. The good thing is we had it all. The much bet­ter thing is — it has a twist. And we like twists because the rest is just bor­ing post­card shit your par­ents dream about.

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When you arrive in Cur­a­cao you will dir­ectly face the real­ity of this 440 km2 island. It was never a touristy place but an island with a huge his­tory of trade and busi­ness. Just a couple of years ago they opened up for invit­ing people from all over the world to visit Cur­a­cao. This is a very inter­est­ing fact because it’ s the found­a­tion we all search for some­how when we travel — ori­gin­al­ity and authen­ti­city. It’ s a place without Make-Up and this truth may be a rough punch in your face leav­ing you a little con­fused the first days. In addi­tion to this you will always struggle with the exotic of this place. Being a dutch colony for so many years includ­ing it’ s archi­tec­ture leaves a weird feel­ing you are some­where in europe all the time and not at the other end of the world.

But the time you get used to it — you will love that you can speak nearly every lan­guage you want includ­ing Papia­mento, Eng­lish, Dutch or Span­ish and get around the island without any trouble.

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From the first day on I was impressed by the old colo­nial archi­tec­ture all over the island and the photo oppor­tun­it­ies that came with that. Espe­cially because many of them seemed to be aban­doned and run down even though they had the per­fect beach front loc­a­tions. The island star­ted to get a mis­ter­i­ous touch for me and I found more and more aban­doned old hotels, res­taur­ants or beach­clubs. You know how we are. We like to explore and we don’ t walk the beaten tracks. So the island opened up in a com­plete dif­fer­ent dir­ec­tion I’ll thought it would do before.

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So Cur­a­cao for me was a per­fect com­bin­a­tion. It sat­is­fied my pas­sion to explore new ori­ginal places and has some of the best photo oppor­tun­it­ies on top, plus you’ll find lonely per­fect beaches to hang out, crys­tall clear water and an amaz­ing under­wa­ter world (yes I was diving with free turtles!!). I would still call it a a little secret to travel to because I think the island will change fast in the next couple of years. But right now, you dive right into the heart of Cur­a­cao and their people when you adjust your expect­a­tions to a carib­bean wonderworld.

If you want to see some more impres­sions jump over to iGNAN­Travel and Trave­lettes.

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3 comments
  1. Ham­mer Bilder.

  2. You really cap­tured the true charm of my adop­ted home Cur­açao. Bey­ond the palm trees and aqua beach scenes lives an inter­est­ing people with an amaz­ing his­tory. Your words and photo images por­tray this very well. I came to the island inter­ested in the archi­tec­ture and restored an old home by the sea that is now called Sirena Bay Estate and run as a guest house. So glad I made this life decision. You helped me define the ques­tion I am most often asked…“Why did you choose to move to Curaçao?”

  3. Wow, Cur­a­cao engulfs such a great diversity. The cul­tural her­it­age it offers is really interesting.

What others had to say about it

  1. […] Last Novem­ber I was invited to travel to the carib­bean island of Cur­a­cao together with Clem­ens, Katja and Bon­nie. It was a very nice trip and I tried to digg deep in the islands mys­ter­ies. See the whole art­icle over at FindingBerlin. […]

  2. […] I was rid­ing the bus and day­dream­ing about the sun­shine Mar­cus brought with him (alas, only in pic­tures from far and exotic islands), I noticed a vague gleam­ing behind the rain­drop covered win­dow: Could that be the long […]

  3. […] may remem­ber that we got the chance to escape last years autumn mad­ness and dis­cover the carib­bean island of CURACAO for one week. Now that sum­mer should finally arrive here I am really look­ing for some place to […]

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